At Statistics Sweden we use cookies so that our website will function well for you. By continuing your surfing on our website you agree to the use of cookies. What is a cookie?

 
Statistical news from Statistics Sweden

2016-03-16 9:30 AM Nr 2016:58


The Swedish Occupational Register with statistics

Cleaning jobs common among foreign born

The most common occupation among foreign born persons on the Swedish labour market was cleaning in 2014. In this group, nearly two out of three men and one out of two women were foreign born. This corresponds to 15 percent of all employed persons.

Starting with the 2014 survey, occupations are reported according to the Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations (SSYK 2012). It reflects today's occupational structure better than the previous occupational classification (SSYK 96).

Of the 4 214 600 employees aged 16-64 on the Swedish labour market, 15 percent were foreign born in 2014. Cleaners accounted for the most common occupations among foreign born persons. The occupation is clearly dominated by women among foreign born, with 69 percent women. Of the 15 most common occupations among foreign born persons, the occupations that were most dominated by men were bus and tram drivers at 94 percent. Helpers in restaurants were the occupation that had the most even distribution of the sexes among the 15 most common occupations among foreign born persons, with 49 percent women and 51 percent men.

The most common occupation for foreign born men was Warehouse and terminal staff while the most common occupations for foreign born women were Assistant nurses, home care and homes for the elderly. The next most common occupation among both foreign born men and women was Cleaner, where 65 percent of the 16 500 men in the occupation and 46 percent of the 52 600 women were foreign born

The 15 most common occupations for foreign born employees aged 16-64, 2014

Occupation[1]

EmployedBorn in
Sweden,
number
Foreign
born,
number
Foreign
born
women,
number
Foreign
born men,
number
Cleaners and helpers in offices, hotels and other establishments
69 100 34 000 35 000 24 300 10 800
Assistant nurses, home care and homes for the elderly
136 000 105 600 30 300 26 900 3 500
Restaurant and kitchen helpers
61 000 41 300 19 700 9 800 10 000
Home-based personal care and related workers
76 900 57 300 19 600 14 900 4 600
Personal assistants
68 100 51 800 16 300 11 600 4 700
Child care workers
77 200 63 200 14 000 12 700 1 300
Warehouse and terminal Staff
73 400 60 100 13 300 2 400 10 900
Primary school teachers
94 500 82 400 12 100 8 500 3 600
Cooks and cold-buffet managers
37 200 26 300 10 900 4 300 6 700
Bus and tram drivers
23 100 13 600 9 500 600 9 000
Machine-tool operators
46 300 38 000 8 300 1 200 7 200
Office clerks not elsewhere classified
76 300 68 100 8 200 6 100 2 100
shop sales, specialty stores
89 300 81 200 8 200 4 500 3 600
shop sales, groceries
70 800 63 000 7 800 4 400 3 300
Software- and system developers
64 200 56 500 7 800 1 900 5 900
Total
4 214 600 3 571 600 643 000 313 600 329 400

1) According to the Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations 2012 (SSYK2012) on the four-digit level.
The figures are rounded to the nearest 100, and thus the shares do not always add up to 100.

Difference in distribution by sex among managers within education

Starting with the 2014 survey, occupations are reported according to the Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations (SSYK 2012). It reflects today's occupational structure better than the previous occupational classification (SSYK 96). Previously it was only possible to see managers within education combined in the Occupational Register. In the SSYK 2012 we can see managers within education divided into three groups. The managers within education were a part of a group dominated by women with 68 percent women and 32 percent men. Among Primary and secondary schools and adult education managers, the distribution was nearly the same, 63 percent women and 37 percent men. Among Preschool managers, the distribution was 89 percent women and 11 percent men. Within the smaller group Education managers not elsewhere classified, the sex distribution was even with 48 percent women and 52 percent men.

Employed managers by area of operations aged 16-64, 2014

Occupation[1]

Women, numberMen, numberWomen, percentMen, percent
Finance managers
8 800 7 900 53 47
Human resource managers
4 800 2 900 62 38
Administration and planning managers
3 800 6 500 37 63
Information, communication and public relations managers
1 900 1 400 57 43
Sales and marketing managers
8 600 22 200 28 72
Administration and service managers not elsewhere classified
7 500 11 600 39 61
Information and communications technology service managers
2 800 9 000 24 76
Supply, logistics and transport managers
2 200 7 900 22 78
Research and development managers
1 300 3 700 26 74
Architectural and engineering managers
2 100 6 300 25 75
Real estate and head of administration manager
600 2 200 22 78
Production managers in construction and mining
1 200 14 700 8 92
Production managers in manufacturing
2 000 13 000 13 87
Forestry and agricultural production managers
100 500 12 88
Primary and secondary schools and adult education managers
6 200 3 700 63 37
Preschool managers
3 600 500 89 11
Education managers not elsewhere classified
400 400 48 52
Health care managers
8 100 2 600 76 24
Managers in social and curative care
2 700 1 100 72 28
Elderly care managers
7 800 1 300 86 14
Managers and leaders within religious bodies
200 500 31 69
Other social services managers
7 400 8 600 46 54
Financial and insurance managers
2 500 4 700 34 66
Hotel and conference managers
700 500 56 44
Restaurant managers
2 500 3 900 39 61
Retail and wholesale trade managers
2 900 6 800 30 70
Sports, leisure and wellness managers
300 500 42 58
Other services managers not elsewhere classified
2 000 4 300 32 68
Total
94 800 149 100 39 61

1) According to Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations (SSYK 2012) on the three-digit level.
All occupational groups excluding Politicians and government officials (SSYK 2012 code 111) and Managing directors and others. (SSYK 2012 code 112).
The figures are rounded to the nearest 100, and thus the shares do not always add up to 100.

Foreign born persons have a higher education than is required by their occupation

Among employed foreign born persons, 29 percent had post secondary education that was 3 years or longer, while the corresponding figure for Swedish born persons was 26 percent. Nevertheless, foreign born persons were employed in occupations with lower requirements for qualifications than were Swedish born persons. 11 percent of the foreign born persons who worked in occupations that only required a shorter education or introduction had long post-secondary education. The corresponding figure for Swedish born persons was 3 percent.

Among persons who worked in occupations that normally require upper secondary education, like work in construction or the manufacturing industry, 72 percent of the Swedish born persons had upper secondary education, while the corresponding figure for foreign born persons was 55 percent. In this case, a greater share of Swedish born persons than foreign born persons had an education that matched the education requirement for the occupation.

Share of foreign born employees aged 16-64 by qualification requirements of occupation, 2014

Occupational skill level

Compulsory
education
Upper
secondary
education
Tertiary
education
1-2 years
Tertiary
education
>2 years
Unknown
education
Managers
5 24 17 51 3
Occupation that requires tertiary education of at least 3 years
1 7 11 77 4
Occupation that requires tertiary education for 1-2 years
6 30 21 41 3
Occupation that requires upper secondary education
16 55 14 13 3
Occupation that requires no or low formal education
33 40 12 11 4
Missing value
22 34 14 18 12
Foreign born, number
94 200 247 700 89 400 186 000 25 700

The total figures are rounded to the nearest 100.

Share of Swedish born employees aged 16-64 by qualification requirements of occupation, 2014
Occupational skill levelCompulsory
education
Upper
secondary
education
Tertiary
education
1-2 years

Tertiary
education
>2 years

Unknown
education
Managers
4 31 22 43 0
Occupation that requires tertiary education of at least 3 years
1 11 18 69 0
Occupation that requires tertiary education for 1-2 years
5 45 25 24 0
Occupation that requires upper secondary education
12 72 11 5 0
Occupation that requires no or low formal education
21 68 8 3 0
Missing value
19 56 12 12 0
Born in Sweden, number
309 900 1 790 800 546 900 920 300 3 600

The total figures are rounded to the nearest 100.

Definitions and explanations

The information refers to employees aged 16-64 who are classified as gainfully employed according to the definition in the register-based labour market statistics (RAMS): all persons who are assessed to have conducted an average of one hour's work per week during the month of November 2014. Even those who were temporarily absent during the measurement period, such as due to sickness, are included in the frame. The term employee also refers to self-employed persons who run their operations as a limited company.

The occupations follow the classifications used in the Swedish Standard Classification of Occupations (SSYK 2012).

Publication

A more detailed report of this survey is published in a Statistical Report.

Next publishing will be

The next statistical news in this series will be published in March 2017.

Logotype

Responsible agency and producer

Statistics Sweden, Enterprise- and Register-based Employment Statistics
SE-701 89 Örebro
+46 19 17 67 51


Enquiries

Susanne Gullberg Brännström
+46 19 17 66 61
susanne.gullbergbrannstrom@scb.se






Feel free to use the facts from this statistical news but remember to state Source: Statistics Sweden.



Sweden | Box 24300, SE 104 51 Stockholm | SE 701 89 Örebro | +46 10 479 40 00