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Statistical news from Statistics Sweden

2015-03-26 9:30 AM Nr 2015:564


Demographic Analysis (DEMOG)Love beyond borders - migration and family patterns:

Love beyond borders - migration and family patterns

Roughly sex out of ten foreign born persons were married or cohabiting when they immigrated to Sweden. Those who immigrate for family reasons or who are seeking asylum are those who are usually in a relationship, while those who immigrate to work or study are more often single. It is more common that single persons move from Sweden again than that those who are in a relationship.

The report Love beyond borders - migration and family patterns describes family situations for 350 000 foreign born persons who immigrated to Sweden between 1998 and 2007. Of those who immigrated, roughly 60 percent were married or cohabiting, either with a person who already lived in Sweden, with a partner who they immigrated together with or with a partner who did not come along to Sweden. It was more common for women to be in a relationship when they immigrated to Sweden than for men to be so.

The tendency for a relationship to break up varies among persons who immigrated to Sweden for different reasons. Among persons who came to Sweden as family member immigrants, roughly eight out of ten were married or cohabiting. Even among persons who received residence permits for asylum reasons, it was common to be married or cohabiting, while most of those who moved to Sweden to work or study were single. Among persons born within the Nordic countries and the EU, roughly half were in a relationship.

Common to form relationships with someone from the same country

Among those who were in a relationship when they immigrated, it was most common to be together with someone from the same country of birth group; this was the case for roughly six out of ten women and men. Roughly two out of ten had a relationship with someone born in Sweden, and roughly one in ten with a person born in another country of birth group. Two out of ten who were in a relationship when they immigrated had separated within ten years.

Some of those who immigrated as single meet a partner in Sweden. After five years in Sweden, 26 percent of those who immigrated had met a partner. It was most common to form a relationship with someone who was born in the same country, but three out of ten women and nearly two out of ten men formed relationships with a person born in Sweden.

More common for singles to emigrate

After ten years in Sweden, roughly two out of ten women and nearly three out of ten men had left Sweden. Those who immigrated to work or to study emigrate to the greatest extent, but a relatively large proportion of persons who were born in a Nordic country or within the EU emigrate.

Persons who were single upon immigration emigrate to a greater extent. One explanation that more singles emigrate is because there is a greater proportion of singles who were born within the Nordic countries or the EU or who have immigrated to work or to study.

A change in one's family situation can influence the tendency to leave Sweden. When we study of those persons who immigrated for family reasons, we see there is more common to emigrate for those who have separated from the partner. This particularly applies to women. For those women who were single when the immigrated, it is less common to emigrate if they have formed a relationship in Sweden compared to those who remained single.

 

Definitions and explanations

This study includes foreign born persons who immigrated to Sweden for the first time during the period 1998 and 2007 and who were age 18 or older when they immigrated. Persons in a relationship refers to those who are either married, in a registered partnership or cohabiting with the person they have children with.

This report presents partners' country of birth based on whether they have the same country of birth group or different country of birth groups.Six country of birth groups are used and Europe is divided into three parts:The Nordic countries (except Sweden), the EU (except the Nordic countries) and the rest of Europe. Countries outside Europe are divided into three groups based on their levels of development as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI). This is an index made annually by the United Nations that takes into account a country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), population life expectancy and level of education

Publication

Read more in the report: Love beyond borders - migration and family patterns. (Summary in English).

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Statistics Sweden, Forecast institute
Box 24300
SE-104 51 Stockholm, Sweden


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Andreas Raneke
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andreas.raneke@scb.se






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